Yearly Archive: 2021

Meager Substance

“Dance Gala Baden-Wuerttemberg”
Theater and Orchestra Heidelberg
Heidelberg, Germany
June 06, 2021 (online)

by Ilona Landgraf
Copyright © 2021 by Ilona Landgraf

1. I.Pérez, artistic director of the Dance Biennial Heidelberg and the Dance Theater Heidelberg © S.Reichardt“Everybody Can Dance” was the motto of this year’s Dance Biennial Heidelberg, the fourth since the event’s inception. Pandemic-related restrictions pared down the three-day festival’s schedule to a few online events, crowned by a dance gala on Sunday, June 6th. Nine of Baden-Wuerttemberg’s dance companies were represented there, together contributing thirteen short pieces – nine digital and four danced live.

The Unterwegstheater Heidelberg, a small touring company whose work spans multiple genres opened the program with the video “Die nackte Wahrheit” (“The Naked Truth”). The film follows three performers (Sada Mamedova, Amancio Gonzales, and Luches Huddleston) through a sparsely furnished flat in an old 2. L.Huddleston and S.Mamedova, “The Naked Truth” by J.Gonzales, Unterwegstheater Heidelberg 2021 © B.Fauserbuilding in Heidelberg. Choreographer Jai Gonzales has the trio move their legs as if warming up, perform floor acrobatics, and walk in zig-zagging lines down the corridor. They’re accompanied by music from Bach and Schubert. Mamedova opens one door over and over again without ever entering the room, hides behind another door, and wriggles and twists her body near the wall beneath an enormous modern painting. Gonzales rehearses hip gyrations in front of the mirror and shows off his fancy white sneakers. Each twist and contortion is well conceived and subject to self-observation. The video would have benefited greatly from courageous cuts.

3. L.Angelini and A.Terribile, “Colors of Beauty” by S.Thoss, National Theater Mannheim 2021 © S.ReichardtThe National Theater Mannheim contributed two pieces: the duet “Green” of “Colors of Beauty” and “Crescendo”, both danced live. In “Green”, two men (Lorenzo Angelini and Alberto Terribile) in white underwear, black socks, a green shirt (Angelini), and black jacket (Terribile) dance in front of a black-and-white projection of a forest glade that gradually fills with color (choreography, video, and costumes by Stephan Thoss). As they crawl and scamper across the floor, and pull the green shirt over each others heads, repetitive rhythms replace the twittering of birds. The motivation for their duet is unclear – perhaps simply the joy of moving.

In “Crescendo”, also choreographed by Thoss, six dancers (three men + three women in gray full-body leotards) stretch as if in a yoga class – arms twirling, bodies twisting, completing a series of unspecific movements for an unspecific reason. According to the short description in the program, the four rectangular green carpets on which they dance, symbolize “blown up nature”. In the final scene, one woman covers herself with a carpet as if it was a bedspread and falls asleep as the others leave. The music is by Arvo Pärt.

4. S.Covi and H.Bae, “45” by D.Gmür, Ballet Theater Pforzheim 2021 © S.Haymann“45” by the Ballet Theater Pforzheim reflects on how bonds and connections between people are possible given that each one’s feel-good-distance is 45 centimeters. The choreographer Damian Gmür places two groups of four dancers each onto a square space. The groups alternate, performing vigorous nondescript movements (sometimes in sync, sometimes solo) to monotonous electronica by Fabian Schulz. Dim lighting alternates with bursts of strobe light. At first, each dancer occupies one quarter of the square; later, the quarters merge. To the sound of torrential rain, one male/female couple starts to crawl across the floor, her caressing him. The connection to the concept of 45 centimeters wasn’t obvious.

5. M.Markl and J.Simon, “Little Sorrows” by C.Liakopoyloy, Nostos Dance Theater 2021 © C.LiakopoyloyThe Heidelberg-based Nostos Dance Theater presented “Little Sorrows”, a piece for two dancers (Miriam Markl and Joseph Simon) that addresses the correlation between the human body and war. Accompanied by meditative music (by Ada Deane) and the sound of flowing water (by Julia Fonseca), Markl, barefooted and decked out in red Adidas sweatpants and a green shirt, writhes on the floor, stumbles sideways as if drunk, and falls on all fours (choreography by Christina Liakopoyloy). Her face is covered by unkempt curls that she pulls tight and straight again and again. A thread from a red ball of wool tied to one of her legs uncoils as she moves. Simon, wearing 6. J.Simon, “Little Sorrows” by C.Liakopoyloy, Nostos Dance Theater 2021 © C.Liakopoyloyfull-body camouflage overalls, scuttles along, his feet crossed-over, his head tilted, holding his arms close to his body, his hands stretching sideways. He suffers from tremor that intensifies into uncontrollable convulsions when he sinks, exhausted, into a crooked plastic chair. Later, he desperately crawls and rolls across the floor, holding his head as if wounded and entangling himself in the red thread. Markl crouches on the margin, disinterested facing away from him and contemplating her hands and her curls. The piece wasn’t particularly pleasant to watch, but had substance.

7. C.Steitz, “The Present Now Will Later Be The Past” by B.Breiner, Baden State Ballet Karlsruhe 2021 © Baden State Ballet Karlsruhe Likewise substantial were the two pieces choreographed by Bridget Breiner, artistic director and chief choreographer of the Baden State Ballet Karlsruhe: “The Present Now Will Later Be The Past” (a solo) and “Cut The World” (a duet).
In “The Present Now Will Later Be The Past”, Carolin Steitz interprets Bob Dylan’s “The Times They Are A’Changin” in a visually rich solo danced around a giant white ribbon tied off in a recumbent figure eight on the floor. This ribbon is raised above the heads of Alba Nadal and Baris Comak in “Cut 8. B.Comak and A.Nadal, “Cut the World” by B.Breiner, Baden State Ballet Karlsruhe 2021 © Baden State Ballet Karlsruhe The World”, titled after the accompanying song by Anthony and the Johnsons. Nadal and Comak dance meters apart, never touching, although their movements are somewhat connected at times. Their feet leave tracks in the white powder that is spread across the floor. After a series of fierce jumps by Comak and frantic turns by Nadal, both stop wearily. If their dance is to depict the state of their relationship, it must be in crisis.

9. F.Vogel, “Metrof” by S.Heller, Stuttgart Ballet 2021 © B.WeisStuttgart Ballet was represented by the solo “Metrof”, choreographed by Shaked Heller to music by Chopin (played live by Paul Lewis) and danced by Friedemann Vogel in front of the marble columns of the Stuttgart Opera House’s foyer. Vogel, flexing his feet and feeling out invisible borders, moves elegantly back and forth across the black dance floor as if searching for something. The lighting was – maybe deliberately – glaring.

The second Stuttgart company, Gauthier Dance from the Theaterhaus Stuttgart, selected three videos from its recent “Dying Swans Project” – a project comprised of sixteen short pieces (each created for one member of the company by another choreographer).

11. S.Yamamoto, “Fallen Wings” by D.Dumais, Gauthier Dance Company 2021 © J.Bak10. A.Cummings, “Covid Cage” by E.Gauthier, Gauthier Dance Company 2021 © J.Bak“Fallen Wings” by Dominique Dumais places dancer Shori Yamamoto in a concrete arena in the autumnal countryside. He screams silently, covering his head with his coat as he jumps. He grabs a handful of earth and lets it trickle down, almost like the flowing grace of tai chi. In the final scene, he walks up a hill towards the sinking sun.

In Kinsun Chan’s “Silent Swan”, Bruna Andrade walks and climbs on the seats of a long row of white chairs in a bright, white hall-like room. Her wide black pants and skimpy bra contrast effectively with the backdrop. She repositions the chairs and lies down on them, finally resting prone on 12. B.Andrade, “Silent Swan” by K.Chan, Gauthier Dance Company 2021 © J.Bakthe floor as if dead.

“Covid Cage” by Eric Gauthier sends Andrew Cummings to an old shingled house to play a grimacing, grinning madman. Only when an older woman (presumably his mother) rings the doorbell does he behave normally. The camera briefly zooms in on a plaster on her upper arm, indicating that she has been vaccinated against Covid-19. Cummings, however, remains confined to his own four walls.

In Reiner Feistel’s “The silence of the men / Klaus discovering the outside” (“Das Schweigen der Männer / Klaus geht raus”), 14. N.Paneva (Alexa), Y.Ebihara (Klaus) and artist of the Theater Ulm, “The silence of the men / Klaus discovering the outside” by R.Feistel, Theater Ulm 2021 © M.Kaufhold13. Artist of the Theater Ulm, “The silence of the men / Klaus discovering the outside” by R.Feistel, Theater Ulm 2021 © M.Kaufholdproduced by the dance theater of the Theater Ulm, we watch as Klaus (Yoh Ebihara), a soda-loving couch potato in sweatpants, watches TV in his untidy bachelor pad. Klaus orders pizza from Amazon’s verbose voice assistant Alexa (Nora Paneva in sexy leather pants) and quarrels with her over the TV remote. Television fuels his dreams with attractive women and spunky men, but he never opens the door of his flat to go out.

15. A.Brys und A.Mueals Blanco, “Oscillation” by I.Pérez, Dance Theater Heidelberg 2021 © S.Reichardt16. A.Muelas Blanco and artist of the Dance Theater Heidelberg, “Oscillation” by I.Pérez, Dance Theater Heidelberg 2021 © A.Poiana “Oscillation”, created for the Dance Theater Heidelberg by its artistic director Iván Pérez (who is also the artistic director of the Dance Biennial Heidelberg), is the third in a trilogy about millennials. This final piece was danced live by three women and three men on a gray box-like stage to music by Ferran Cruixent. The dancers stand motionless, then begin to walk and run, always keeping spacious distance between themselves and the others. Their movements shift from slow to fast – first freezing, then moving in slow motion, then bursting fiercely into motion. Solos, danced in groups of three, seem to be free-style inventions, as the dancers frequently ran on and off of the stage. The video projection depicted on one photo wasn’t part of the performance. “Oscillation” was uneventful and lengthy.

The host of the evening – Hendrik Richter – was the unfortunate victim of imperfect audio-visual synchronization and a cameraperson who pointed the lens at his crotch.

Links: Website of the Dance Theater Heidelberg
Photos: 1. Iván Pérez, artistic director of the Dance Biennial Heidelberg and the Dance Theater Heidelberg © Susanne Reichardt
2. Luches Huddleston and Sada Mamedova, “The Naked Truth” by Jai Gonzales, Unterwegstheater Heidelberg 2021 © Bernhard Fauser
3. Lorenzo Angelini and Alberto Terribile, “Colors of Beauty” by Stephan Thoss, National Theater Mannheim 2021 © Susanne Reichardt
4. Stella Covi and Hyeun-Woo Bae, “45” by Damian Gmür, Ballet Theater Pforzheim 2021 © Sabine Haymann
5. Miriam Markl and Joseph Simon, “Little Sorrows” by Christina Liakopoyloy, Nostos Dance Theater 2021 © Christina Liakopoyloy
6. Joseph Simon, “Little Sorrows” by Christina Liakopoyloy, Nostos Dance Theater 2021 © Christina Liakopoyloy
7. Carolin Steitz, “The Present Now Will Later Be The Past” by Bridget Breiner, Baden State Ballet Karlsruhe 2021 © Baden State Ballet Karlsruhe
8. Baris Comak and Alba Nadal, “Cut the World” by Bridget Breiner, Baden State Ballet Karlsruhe 2021 © Baden State Ballet Karlsruhe
9. Friedemann Vogel, “Metrof” by Shaked Heller, Stuttgart Ballet 2021 © Bernhard Weis
10. Andrew Cummings, “Covid Cage” by Eric Gauthier, Gauthier Dance Company 2021 © Jeanette Bak
11. Shori Yamamoto, “Fallen Wings” by Dominique Dumais, Gauthier Dance Company 2021 © Jeanette Bak
12. Bruna Andrade, “Silent Swan” by Kinsun Chan, Gauthier Dance Company 2021 © Jeanette Bak
13. Artist of the Theater Ulm, The silence of the men / Klaus discovering the outside” by Reiner Feistel, Theater Ulm 2021 © Martin Kaufhold
14. Nora Paneva (Alexa), Yoh Ebihara (Klaus) and artist of the Theater Ulm, The silence of the men / Klaus discovering the outside” by Reiner Feistel, Theater Ulm 2021 © Martin Kaufhold
15. Arno Brys und Andrea Mueals Blanco, “Oscillation” by Iván Pérez, Dance Theater Heidelberg 2021 © Susanne Reichardt
16. Andrea Muelas Blanco and artist of the Dance Theater Heidelberg, “Oscillation” by Iván Pérez, Dance Theater Heidelberg 2021 © Alwin Poiana
Editing: Jake Stepansky



Incongruent

“Lyssa”
The Royal Ballet & Nadine Shah
Royal Opera House
London, Great Britain
June 04, 2021 (dance film)

by Ilona Landgraf
Copyright © 2021 by Ilona Landgraf

1. N.Shah and artists of the the Royal Ballet in “Lyssa” by L.Page, The Royal Ballet 2021 © A.Verzhbinsky In late 2019, the British choreographer Lynne Page created “Death in Venice” for the Royal Opera. “Lyssa”, a twenty-or-so-minute film, features her first-ever choreography for the Royal Ballet. After a year of pandemic-induced artistic drought (and a severe lack of live music), she felt that the time was ripe for arts institutions to tackle new genres in order to reach new audiences. This project, a merger between song and dance, brings together the English singer / songwriter Nadine Shah and seventeen female dancers from the Royal Ballet. Shah sings “Trad” from her 2020 album “Kitchen Sink”, a less-than-four-minute song with very few lyrics, which has been extended to fifteen minutes in a new version featuring the orchestra of the Royal Opera House. (more…)

The Royal Ballet Re-Opens

“21st-Century Choreographers”
(“Within the Golden Hour” / Optional Family: A Divertissement” / “The Statement” / “Solo Echo”)

The Royal Ballet
Royal Opera House
London, Great Britain
May 28, 2021 (online)

by Ilona Landgraf
Copyright © 2021 by Ilona Landgraf

1. Artists of the Royal Ballet, “Within the Golden Hour” by C.Wheeldon, The Royal Ballet 2021 © B.Cooper Over half a year ago, pandemic-related restrictions forced the Royal Opera House to close its doors. On May 18th, a limited audience was finally welcomed back to see the company live on stage. The program – “21st-Century Choreographers” – consisted of four pieces: “Within the Golden Hour” by Christopher Wheeldon; “Optional Family: A Divertissement” – a new piece by Kyle Abraham; and two pieces by Crystal Pite: “The Statement” and “Solo Echo”. (more…)

Made For Film

“Young Creatives” (“Memento” / “Rose” / “I Feel It Too”)
Dutch National Ballet
Dutch National Opera & Ballet
Amsterdam, The Netherlands
May, 2021 (online)

by Ilona Landgraf
Copyright © 2021 by Ilona Landgraf

1. B.Stoop, D.Bai, S.Quintyn, L.Rosillo, W.Wijkstra, and M.Kumar, “Memento” by W.Kuindersma, Dutch National Ballet 2021 © H.GerritsenFollowing the online premiere of “Metamorphosis”, the new ballet by Dutch National Ballet’s associate artist David Dawson, the company released three additional videos at the end of May. Each features a ballet film by a young creative associate: “Memento” (concept and choreography by Wubkje Kuindersma), “Rose” (direction, concept, and choreography by Milena Sidorova), and “I Feel It Too” (creative direction and choreography by Sedrig Verwoert). All three films can be viewed for free on the company’s YouTube channel until October 2021. (more…)

The Royal Ballet’s Young Choreographers

“Spring Draft Works”
The Royal Ballet
Royal Opera House
London, Great Britain
May 14, April 2021 (online)

by Ilona Landgraf
Copyright © 2021 by Ilona Landgraf

1. J.Junker, I.Lubach, F.Serrano, I.Gasparini, K.McNally, and T.Dubreuil, “The Morning Routine” by J.Junker, The Royal Ballet 2021 © A.UspenskiIt’s hard to imagine that the pandemic has had any positive impact on the performing arts – but, as Kevin O’Hare, the Royal Ballet’s ever-optimistic artistic director points out in his introductory comments on this season’s “Spring Draft Works” (an annual project that assembles choreographies created by the company’s dancers) – there’s a silver lining: more free time to unlock hidden choreographic potential and rehearse, and the chance to include live music. Even the renowned lighting designer Natasha Chivers had time to create clever lighting tailored to each piece. (more…)

What Became of …?

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”
Teatro dell’Opera di Roma Ballet School
Teatro Nazionale
Rome, Italy
May 2021

by Ilona Landgraf
Copyright © 2021 by Ilona Landgraf

1. G.Starace (Oberon), C.Onesti (Titania), and ensemble, “A Midsummer Night's Dream” by A.Delle Monache, Teatro dell’Opera di Roma Ballet School 2014 © Y.KageyamaEarlier this May, the Teatro dell’Opera di Roma unearthed an archival recording of a 2014 performance by the opera’s ballet school: Shakespeare’s romantic comedy (or, rather, satire on romantic comedy) “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”, choreographed and directed by Alessandra Delle Monache. Her genre-spanning production is grounded by the explanations of a narrator (Giulia Tomaselli, a student of the Accademia Nazionale D’Arte Drammatica Silvio d’Amico, Rome) who helps us sort out the tangle of romances blossoming in the forests outside Athens. It’s an understandable move, since – unlike in other productions – two of the four couples (Hermia & Lysander, Helena & Demetrius) are dressed so similarly that mixing them up is inevitable. (more…)

What a Mess

“The Order of the King”
Ural Opera Ballet
Ekaterinburg State Academic Opera and Ballet Theatre
Ekaterinburg, Russia
May 02, 2021 (online)

by Ilona Landgraf
Copyright © 2021 by Ilona Landgraf

1. M.Klekovkin (The King) and ensemble, “The Order of the King” by V.Samodurov, Ural Opera Ballet 2021 © O.Kerelyuk / Ural Opera Ballet “The Order of the King” – choreographed in 2018 for the Ural Opera Ballet by its artistic director Vyacheslav Samodurov – won two Golden Mask awards last year. Samodurov was awarded the prize for Best Choreographer and set designer Aleksei Kondratiev the prize for Best Designer in Musical Theatre. The ambitious two-act production marked the bicentennial of Marius Petipa’s birth and was staged according to his templates, augmented by additional historic analysis and scientific research. (more…)

Uplifting

“The Sleeping Beauty”
Czech National Ballet
The National Theatre
Prague, Czech Republic
April 29, 2021 (online)

by Ilona Landgraf
Copyright © 2021 by Ilona Landgraf

1.A.Fujii (Fairy of Wisdom), A.Pera (Fairy of Grace), E.V.Gonzales (Fairy of Force), R.Zvonařová (Lilac Fairy), M.Hejduková (Fairy of Beauty), K.Němečková (Fairy of Eloquence), P.Holeček (Carabosse), and ensemble, “The Sleeping Beauty” by M.Haydée after M.Petipa, Czech National Ballet 2021 © S.Gherciu It is nearly impossible to mount a three-act full-ensemble classic in the midst of a pandemic – or at least it has been for many companies. That the Czech National Ballet accomplished this feat feels like a harbinger of better times to come. Last Thursday, on World Dance Day, they premiered “The Sleeping Beauty” on their YouTube channel. The video will be online until May 5th. (more…)

Nuremberg’s Junior Choreographers (III)

Exquisite Corpse Extra” (episode 3)
Ballet of the State Theater Nuremberg

State Theater
Nuremberg, Germany
April 24, 2021 (online)

by Ilona Landgraf
Copyright © 2021 by Ilona Landgraf

1. V.Ketelslegers, “The Path” by C.Ide, Ballet of the State Theater Nuremberg 2021 © B.StößThe final program of the three-part “Exquisite Corpse Extra” project by the Ballet of the State Theater Nuremberg was comprised of four short contemporary pieces by six young choreographers: Chisato Ide, Bo Jacobs, and Oscar Alonso (who created one piece each) and Michael García, Victor Ketelslegers, and Ana Tavares (who created a joint work). As with the previous presentations (episode 1, episode 2), the program lasted for around a half hour and was accompanied by videos in which the choreographers commented on their work. (more…)

Let’s Party!

“Brahms Party”
Ural Opera Ballet
Ekaterinburg State Academic Opera and Ballet Theatre
Ekaterinburg, Russia
April 2021 (video)

 

by Ilona Landgraf
Copyright © 2021 by Ilona Landgraf

1. Ensemble, “Brahms Party” by A.Pimonov, Ural Opera Ballet 2021 © O.Kerelyuk / Ural Opera Ballet Last season, two of the Ural Opera Ballet’s programs were nominated for Golden Mask awards in several categories: “Walpurgisnacht” by George Balanchine (which was shown in a double bill with “Brahms Party” by Anton Pimonov) and “The Order of the King”, a full-evening piece by the company’s artistic director Vyacheslav Samodurov. Though the pandemic halted the festival the first time around, the company brought both productions to the Stanislavsky and Nemirovich-Danchenko Moscow Music Theatre as part of this season’s festival in mid-April. (more…)

Nuremberg’s Junior Choreographers (II)

“Exquisite Corpse Extra” (episode 2)
Ballet of the State Theater Nuremberg
State Theater
Nuremberg, Germany
April 17, 2021 (online)

by Ilona Landgraf
Copyright © 2021 by Ilona Landgraf

1. E.Nunes and L.Axel, “Indoor” by L.Axel, Ballet of the State Theater Nuremberg 2021 © B.StößThe second part of the State Ballet Nuremberg’s “Exquisite Corpse Extra” project featured works by four aspiring choreographers: Lucas Axel, Sarah-Lee Chapman, Kate Gee, and Sofie Vervaecke. As with the first part, the program lasted for around a half hour and was accompanied by videos of the dancers commenting on their work.

The opening piece was by Brazilian-born Axel, who received his training at the Bolshoi Theater School in Joinville/Brazil and danced with three companies in São Paulo before moving to Germany. There, he joined the ballet of the State Theater Augsburg, later moving to Nuremberg’s company. He describes himself as having struggled with anxiety since the age of ten. This experience was one grounding focus of his choreography – depression, anxiety, and death. (more…)

Marijn Rademaker Turns to Choreography

Verklärte Nacht” (“Transfigured Night”)
Ballet Dortmund

Theater Dortmund
Dortmund, Germany
April 17, 2021 (online)

by Ilona Landgraf
Copyright © 2021 by Ilona Landgraf

1. A.Uzunova and L.Kalbusch, “Verklärte Nacht” (“Transfigured Night”) by M.Rademaker, Ballet Dortmund 2021 © L.JanuszewskiFour years ago, Marijn Rademaker told me about his excitement to return to the stage after a long break resulting from injury. At that time, he was involved in umpteen other projects, yet had not given any indication that he wanted to try his hand at choreography or direction – but, as with any seed, talent can sprout in hiding.

This Saturday, Rademaker presented the first result of his new ambition: “Verklärte Nacht” (“Transfigured Night”), a contemporary ballet-film set to Arnold Schoenberg’s eponymous thirty-minute composition, created in collaboration with the Academy for Theatre and Digitality, Dortmund, and the filmmaker Mathieu Gremillet. It was danced by the Ballet Dortmund. (more…)

Nuremberg’s Junior Choreographers (I)

“Exquisite Corpse Extra” (episode 1)
Ballet of the State Theater Nuremberg
State Theater
Nuremberg, Germany
April 10, 2021 (online)

by Ilona Landgraf
Copyright © 2021 by Ilona Landgraf

1. C. Blanco, “Me Inside Me” by C.Blanco, Ballet of the State Theater Nuremberg 2021 © B.StößThirteen of the State Theater Nuremberg’s twenty-one dancers tried their hand at choreography this season, resulting in eleven new contemporary pieces split over three programs. The first of these programs premiered last Saturday; the remaining two will be broadcast online on upcoming weekends.
The first program (approximately 30 minutes) was assembled from three short pieces: a solo (choreographed and danced by Carlos Blanco) and two ensemble works (one by Edward Nunes and one by Andy Fernández). Each choreographer commented on their work in an accompanying video. (more…)

Dancers’ Choice

Spring Special”
Dutch National Ballet
Dutch National Opera & Ballet
Amsterdam, The Netherlands
April 05, 2021 (online)

by Ilona Landgraf
Copyright © 2021 by Ilona Landgraf

1. N.Tonoli, S.Yamada, J.Spunda, and S.Leverashvili (Peasants), “Giselle“ by M.Petipa after J.Coralli and J.Perrot, production and additional choreography by R.Beaujean and R.Bustamante, Dutch National Ballet 2021 © H.GerritsenFor most artists, the flow of opportunities for performance on home stages or abroad has either thinned to a trickle or dried up altogether since the onset of the pandemic. The Dutch National Ballet filled some of those gaps with a “Spring Special” -gala that featured a selection of ten short pieces in total – eight excerpts from the company’s existing repertory, one new acquisition, and one world premiere. Each dancer was able to choose which piece to perform in (with appropriate attention to pandemic-related restrictions of group size). All of the principals, several soloists, and one member of the corps de ballet participated. The gala was streamed live on April 5th. A second broadcast is scheduled for April 10, 2021 (more…)

Saucy

In and Out”
Junior Company of the Dutch National Ballet
Dutch National Opera & Ballet
Amsterdam, The Netherlands
March / April 2021 (online video)

by Ilona Landgraf
Copyright © 2021 by Ilona Landgraf

1. E.Mardegan (center) and members of the Junior Company, “In and Out” by H.van Manen, Junior Company of the Dutch National Ballet 2021 © H.GerritsenAlthough the Dutch National Ballet’s Junior Company hoped to tour Hans van Manen’s “In and Out” in spring 2020, their plan was shattered by the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Recently, though, the current members of the Junior Company revived the short ballet on the Dutch National Ballet & Opera’s main-stage. The performance was recorded and can be viewed for free until April 25, 2021 on the company’s website.

(more…)